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You are here:   OldClasses > 2012 > Alloeocomatella pectinifera | Shuting Jin

 

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Alloeocomatella pectinifera

(Clark 1911)

Red Feather Star

Shuting Jin (2012)

 

Fact Sheet

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Summary


Physical Description


Ecology


Local Distribution and Habitats


Commensalisms


Life History & Behaviour


Reproduction


Feeding


Cyclicity


Anatomy and Physiology


External Anatomy


Internal Anatomy


Physiology


Evolution & Systematics


Fossil Record


Phylogeny


Biogeographic Distribution


Conservation


Status


Threats


Resources


References


Acknowledgements


Contact

Reproduction

The reproduction of A. pectinifera has not been investigated, however, with the exception of a few hermaphroditic species, nearly all crinoids are dioecious, with separate sexes (Ruppert et al. 2004). The gonads of crinoids are usually located in the pinnules on the proximal half of the arm (Ruppert et al. 2004). During spawning, the pinnule walls rupture, releasing the vitellaria, or free-swimming, larvae into the water column (Ruppert et al. 2004). The larvae do not feed and settle after a short time in the water column to the bottom.

Post-settlement, feather stars undergo metamorphosis, changing from oblong, ciliated larvae into tiny, stalked juveniles (Ruppert et al. 2004). After several months, the cirri are eventually formed, and the young feather star breaks free from its stalk and becomes a free-living adult (Ruppert et al. 2004).

Although crinoids can regenerate lost arms, they are not able to reproduce clonally as in other echinoderms (Ruppert et al. 2004). 

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