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You are here:   OldClasses > 2012 > Ophioplocus imbricatus | Emma Ceccato

 

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Ophioplocus imbricatus
 
(Müller & Troschel 1842)

                        Emma Ceccato (2012)

 

 

Fact Sheet

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Summary


Physical Description


Colouration and Markings


Size and Biometrics


Ecology

Local Description


Micro-habitat and Associations


Life History & Behaviour

Feeding


Reproduction


Locomotion


Anatomy & Physiology

External Morphology


Internal Anatomy


Evolution & Systematics

Fossil Record


Evolution and Origins


Classification and Systematics


Biogeographic Distribution


Conservation & Threats


References & Links

Fossil Record

Skeletal plates of ophiuroids consist of high-Mg calcite which is later transformed to low-Mg calcite during the process of diagenesis (Stohr et al. 2012). The low-Mg calcite exhibits high chemophysical stability therefore the skeleton of brittle stars is likely to be preserved in most marine rocks (Stohr et al. 2012). The fossil record indicates that most extant brittle star groups seems to emerge in the Late Mesozoic era although fossils from Upper Devonian to Lower Carboniferous demonstrate close similarities with present-day brittle stars, revealing that brittle star radiation could have occurred earlier than once thought (Jagt 2009). Limited literature was found in relation to the evolution of the genus Ophioplocus.

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Classification

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