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You are here:   animal list > Cypraea tigris

 

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Cypraea Tigris Linnaeus 1758

Tiger Cowry



Chantelle Reid (2011)





 

Fact Sheet

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Overview

Brief Summary


Historical importance


Ecology

Local Distribution and Habitats


Biogeographical Distribution


Life History

Behaviour


Cyclicity


Evolution & Systematics

Systematics or Phylogenetics


Morphology and Physiology

External Morphology


Anatomy


Conservation

Threats


Wikipedia


References & More Information

Bibliographies


 

The Tiger Cowry (Cypraea tigris) is a species of tropical gastropod belonging to the family Cypraeidae (Walls 1987). They are found throughout the Indo-Pacific and are recognisable by their brown spotted shells (Burgess 1986). Historically, cowry shells have been collected and used as currency (such as the species Cypraea moneta) or as souveniers, and little interest has been shown for the animal that lives within. The earliest mention of cowrie shells can be traced back to the 14th Century B.C, where in China they were used as currency (Burgess 1986).

 


Like all cowries, C. tigris is able to fully extend its mantle to completely cover the shell (which can clearly be seen in the above picture). It is also one of the most common species of cowries and their large papillae are very distinct. Sexes are seperate and females are generally larger than males (Burgess 1986).

Classification

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Kingdom
Animalia
Phylum
Mollusca
Class
Gastropoda
Order
Littorinimorpha
Superfamily
Cypraeoidea