Select the search type
 
  • Site
  • Web
Search
You are here:   animal list > Reteterebella queenslandia

 

Minimize

 

Reteterebella queenslandia Hartman 1863

Spaghetti worm




Lachlan Gleeson (2011)

 

 

Fact Sheet

Minimize
Overview

Brief Summary


Comprehensive Description


Physical Description

Size and Defining Characteristics


Identification


Ecology

Distribution and Habitats


Micro-habitats and Associations


Crypsis


Life History & Behaviour

Behaviour


Focus Section


Evolution & Systematics

Phylogenetics


Systematics


Morphology and Physiology

External Morphology


Internal Anatomy


Cell Biology


Molecular Biology & Genetics

Molecular Biology


Conservation

Trends


Threats


Wikipedia


References & More Information

Bibliographies


Biodiversity Heritage Library


Search the Web


Biomedical Terms


Names & Taxonomy

Related Names


Synonyms


Common Names


Page Statistics

Content Summary

Crypsis

Reteterebella queenslandia relies on crypsis for survival. They spend all of their known life under coral boulders/coral rubble in sandy substrates of coral reef lagoons. They burrow into the sand or attach to the underside of coral boulders. R. queenslandia also accumulates sand particles to create tubing for protection. The tubes are constructed out of particles of sand that are too large to eat and mucus. Their role in defence is not clear as the worms are found in hard to reach places, limiting the additional protection gained by this tube. However the tube may protect from small predators that are able to move through the benthos.

 
 
A cluster of spaghetti worms after a coral boulder has been overturned. Several tubes are empty due to the organisms swimming through the coral boulder and back down to the benthos.
 

The tentacles of R. queenslandia are the only parts visible from the surface. When touched or disturbed, they are able to retract these tentacles beneath the coral bolder, protecting themselves from predators. R. queenslandia also collects sand particles to build protective casings. It uses its tentacles to collect grains of sand, coating them in mucus and gluing them together to form a protective tube. The feeding tentacles are also sensitive to light. When the worm is disturbed, the tentacles actively seek out areas which have low light to hide in. This behaviour ceases once the worm has found a dark crevice to hide in. This indicates that the photoreceptors are used to find habitat and not to avoid predation.

 
Pair of R. queenslandia retracting their buccal tentacles after their crevice was overturned.

Images

Minimize

(2 objects, created 5/6/2011)

Album: This is a private album that is not visible to anonymous users Great Barrier Reef Invertebrates

Summary:

Date:

Album: 2012

Album: 2011

Classification

Minimize
Kingdom
Animalia
Phylum
Annelida
Class
Polychaeta
Order
Terebellida
Family
Terebellidae
Genus
Reteterebella

Synonyms

Reterebella queenslandia ([auctt.])